Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Patients with haematological malignancies are a high-user group for blood transfusions. Here, we describe the current evidence on transfusion policies in patients with haematological malignancies, based on recent systematic reviews of RCTs. RECENT FINDINGS: Results from six RCTs (1195 participants) suggest that prophylactic platelet transfusions reduce bleeding compared with therapeutic-only use, although the effects varied according to patient diagnosis/treatment plan. A meta-analysis of seven RCTs (1814 participants) reported that low-dose platelet transfusions (1.1 × 10/m ± 25%) were noninferior to standard dose (2.2 × 10/m ± 25%), or high dose (4.4 × 10/m ± 25%). Three RCTs (499 participants) reported that restrictive platelet count thresholds (less than 10 × 10/l) were noninferior to liberal thresholds counts (less than 20-30 × 10/l). For red-cell transfusions, the data from completed RCTs was less advanced. A recent meta-analysis with four RCTs (240 participants) suggested that restrictive thresholds (less than 70-90 g/l) are noninferior to liberal thresholds (less than 80-120 g/l), but with more uncertainty for clinical outcomes. SUMMARY: There is support from randomised trials for using prophylactic platelet transfusions, in low-dose, and with restrictive thresholds. No large completed studies have been published for red-cell transfusions. Many studies overall were arguably underpowered and only offered low-to-medium grade level evidence.

Original publication

DOI

10.1097/MOH.0000000000000377

Type

Journal article

Journal

Curr Opin Hematol

Publication Date

11/2017

Volume

24

Pages

515 - 520

Keywords

Erythrocyte Transfusion, Female, Hematologic Neoplasms, Humans, Male, Platelet Transfusion, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic