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Objectives: Retrospective review of early results with aortic valve repair (AVr) techniques. Methods: 61 consecutive patients underwent AVr surgery at our institutions between 2008 and 2018. 14 patients had a bicuspid aortic valve and 16 had a connective tissue disorder. In 48 patients, aortic regurgitation (AR) was secondary to an aortic root and/or ascending aneurysms, while in 13 it was due to primary cusp pathologies. 13 patients underwent isolated cusp repair, 19 sinotubular junction remodelling, 25 valve-sparing root replacement (VSRR) and 4 hemiroot replacement. Cusp repair techniques included: 18 free margin plication, 18 commissural re-suspensions, 3 raphe resections and 1 free-edge reinforcement. Subcommissural annuloplasty was performed in 25 patients (42%) with a dilated annulus (>28 mm). Results: 50 patients (82%) left the operating theatre with no AR, 8 with mild central and 3 with mild eccentric AR. In-hospital survival was 100%. Clinical follow-up was complete at 5.08±2.29 years and all patients were alive. Transthoracic echocardiographic follow-up was complete at 2.35±1.92 years and showed the presence of a moderate AR in 10 patients (18%) and severe AR in 2 patients (4%). One of these required re-do aortic valve replacement 6 years after VSRR. Freedom from re-operation at 8 years was 88.15%±1.51%. Conclusion: Good early results are achievable following AVr with acceptable medium-term outcomes. AVr surgery continues to evolve, and concentrating the experience in specialist centres in the UK is recommended.

Original publication

DOI

10.1136/openhrt-2019-001107

Type

Journal article

Journal

Open Heart

Publication Date

2019

Volume

6

Keywords

Marfans, aortic disease, aortic valve disease, surgery-valve