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Gene therapy for cystic fibrosis shows encouraging results

Boehringer Ingelheim, IP Group, the UK Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium and Oxford Biomedica, have announced that Boehringer Ingelheim has exercised its options on intellectual property and know-how from the partners to progress and further accelerate the development of a potential, new treatment option for patients with cystic fibrosis.

Professors Deborah Gill and Stephen Hyde are founding members of the UK CF Gene Therapy Consortium in 2001, a consortium of scientists and clinicians that continues to work toward making gene therapy a reality for patients with cystic fibrosis.

Professor Gill said "We have been working closely with Boehringer Ingelheim and Oxford Biomedica since 2018 and this acceleration of our gene therapy programme for patients with cystic fibrosis is very exciting for our research team.”   

Professor Hyde added "The collaborative nature of this project, including the long-running UK Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium that brought together researchers from three UK Universities, has been an important driver of our progress. We hope to continue to build on this."

Find out more about the research done by the Gill and Hyde Gene Medicine Research group

Read the full announcement

 

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