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We are pleased to announce the appointment of Professor Alison Banham as Head of the Nuffield Division of Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NDCLS) for an initial period of three years from 1 December 2014, in succession to Professor Kevin Gatter.

Alison is Professor of Haemato-oncology and has been Deputy Head of NCDLS since 2013. She Chairs the RDM Mentoring Committee and sits on the RDM Management Committee. She brings an extensive range of skills and experience to her new role as Head of NDCLS.

We would like to take this opportunity to thank Professor Kevin Gatter for his long and distinguished service as Head of Department – of Cellular Science since 1994, and of NDCLS since 1999, including the mergers with the Nuffield Department of Clinical Biochemistry (1997) and the Nuffield Department of Pathology (1999). Through these roles, Professor Gatter has made major contributions to academic pathology in Oxford, which we wish to continue to build on for the future.

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