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Professors Irv Weissman and Ravi Majeti at Stanford University and Professor Paresh Vyas at the MRC Molecular Haematology Unit, are working on an antibody from the Stanford investigators that enables the immune system to detect and kill cancer cells.

Picture of the actin cytoskeleton stained in red.

They are now testing whether it’s safe and effective for use in people with blood cancer. In this week’s blog they tell us how they collaborated across the Atlantic to get public funding for a project that has led to a spin out with multiple backers and a promising clinical trial.

You can read more about the work on the MRC Insight blog

 

This post was originally published on MRC Insight under the title ‘Fighting cancer like an infection’ under CC BY 4.0

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