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Congratulations to Dr Adam Mead who has been awarded an MRC Senior Clinical Fellowship. Adam's research will focus on "Unravelling biological heterogeneity in neoplastic myeloproliferative stem cells”.

Blood stem cells (purple) emerging in the floor of the dorsal aorta independently of the circulating primitive red cells in zebrafish embryos. © Before use, permission must be obtained from Roger Patient (roger.patient@imm.ox.ac.uk)
Blood stem cells (purple) emerging in the floor of the dorsal aorta independently of the circulating primitive red cells in zebrafish embryos.

In particular, Adam and his research team will be applying single-cell genomics to gain insights into the clonal architecture of propagating cancer stem cell populations in the myeloproliferative neoplasms. This will allow mutation status to be correlated with global gene expression profiles, at the single cell level, in order to help explain phenotypic heterogeneity and mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapies in these disorders. These studies will help to translate advances in single cell technology through detailed analysis of human cancer stem cells, with broader relevance for cancer biology.

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