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Professor Jan Rehwinkel’s team, from the MRC Human Immunology Unit in the WIMM, have found that human cells use viruses as Trojan horses, transporting a messenger that encourages the immune system to fight the very virus that carries it. Their discovery, published in Science, could have implications for the design of new vaccines.

Pipetting red liquid © Permission required for use. Credit: Doug Vernimmen

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