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AIMS: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Apolipoproteins are emerging as powerful predictors of CVD. We aimed to study associations of metabolic syndrome and apoB, apoAI, apoB/AI ratio in young Sri Lankans with type 2 diabetes. MATERIALS & METHODS: Blood samples were available from 690 patients with type 2 diabetes in Sri Lanka Young Diabetes Study, and were analysed for apoB, apoAI, total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), triglycerides (TG) and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). Their associations with MetS as perNCEP/ATPIII criteria were studied. RESULTS: MetS was present in 60.9% of subjects. Of those with MetS, 76.0% were women. Those with MetS had higher apoB (1.27 V s 1.19 mmol/L; p = 0.001), apoB/AI (0.80 V s 0.75; p = 0.001), non-HDL cholesterol (NHDLC) (4.15 V s 3.98 mmol/L; p = 0.002),and triglycerides (1.51 V s 1.31 mmol/L; p < 0.001) and lower apoAI (1.58 V s 1.60 mmol/L; p = 0.03) and HDLC (1.02 V s 1.16 mmol/L, p < 0.001). ApoB and apoB/AIlevels increased significantly as the number of MetS components increased. ApoB and apoB:AI ratio were independently associated with MetS and components. CONCLUSION: MetS showed a high prevalence among young Sri Lankans with diabetes. Elevated apoB is commonly clustered with other risk indicators in MetS.

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/j.dsx.2018.07.002

Type

Journal article

Journal

Diabetes Metab Syndr

Publication Date

09/2019

Volume

13

Pages

3057 - 3063

Keywords

Apolipoproteins, Coronary artery disease, Diabetes, Dyslipidemia, Metabolic syndrome, apoB, Adolescent, Adult, Apolipoprotein B-100, Biomarkers, Case-Control Studies, Cholesterol, Cholesterol, HDL, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Lipids, Male, Metabolic Syndrome, Prevalence, Prognosis, Sri Lanka, Young Adult