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RDM researchers are heading down to London this week for New Scientist Live – the UK's biggest festival of science, technology, ideas and discovery.

Logo of new scientist live 2016

The team from the WIMM will be showcasing innovative new software that allows users to play with DNA in 3D space. The interactive exhibition will highlight how tiny changes in our DNA code can have big consequences for DNA folding and consequently human health. Visitors will be able to explore how intricate DNA folding dictates what genes can be accessed in different cells – giving cells their unique functions.

The team will be exhibiting from 22 to 25 September. Find out more about the event online.

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