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The award recognises and solidifies Professor Tyler's collaborative work with the MR Research Centre, part of the Department of Clinical Medicine at the University of Aarhus.

L-R: Dr Lau (Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Oxford), Prof Tyler and Prof Laustsen (MR Research Centre, at Aarhus)

 

I am delighted and honoured to have been recognised with this award which will strengthen our ongoing collaborations with Prof Laustsen and his team at the University of Aarhus. - Prof Tyler

Congratulations are in order to Professor Damian Tyler, who has been awarded an Honorary Skou Professorship at the University of Aarhus in Denmark.

The Honorary Skou Professorships are named in honour of Jens Christian Skou, winner of the Nobel Prize in 1997 for the first discovery of an ion-transporting enzyme, Na+, K+ -ATPase. Prof Skou was a former professor at the faculty of health at the University of Aarhus.

The University's initiative aims to to introduce new perspectives to teaching, strengthen relations with leading research units abroad and establish joint research projects and funding applications.

The Skou Professors actively participate in the academic work of the individual departments, either as guest lecturers and co-supervisors on PhD projects, or in the form of research partnerships and joint funding applications, or as guest lecturers at symposiums and conferences.

Prof Tyler, alongside Academic Visitor to the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Dr Justin Lau, works closely with Prof Christoper Laustsen, who heads up a team at the University's MR Research Centre.

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