Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Rajna Golubic

NIHR Academic Clinical Lecturer in diabetes and endocrinology

Rajna joined OCDEM and Diabetes Trials Unit in June 2021 an NIHR Academic Clinical Lecturer and a speciality registrar in diabetes and endocrinology. She qualified as a medical doctor at the Zagreb University School of Medicine in Croatia. Rajna completed an MPhil in Public Health and a PhD in Epidemiology at the MRC Epidemiology Unit, both as a Gates Cambridge Scholar. Her PhD focused on the descriptive epidemiology and measurement aspects of physical activity as well as its associations with cardio-metabolic disorders. Subsequently, Rajna worked as an NIHR Academic Clinical Fellow at Cambridge combining clinical practice in diabetes and endocrinology with research into the treatment of diabetes and obesity. At Cambridge, Rajna was a co-investigator on several trials conducted as a partnership between academia and industry with a more prominent focus on novel treatments such as dual agonists (cotadutide- GLP1/glucagon agonist). She has been awarded a pump priming grant from the Diabetes Research and Wellness Foundation to be a principal investigator of a proof-of-concept study focusing on the effects of serotonin receptor agonism on glucose homeostasis (conducted in Cambridge). Rajna has been a lead investigator with the NNEdPro Global Centre for Nutrition and Health over the past decade. She has been active in teaching medical students and is associate editor of the Oxford Handbook of Clinical and Healthcare Research.

At Oxford, Rajna’s work is centred around large scale clinical trials, cohorts, and healthcare data aiming to address the questions about the risk factors and treatment for diabetes and related metabolic disorders and associated resource use.

ORCID ID: 0000-0003-0419-9582