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OBJECTIVE: Wolfram syndrome 1 (WFS1) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with risk of type 2 diabetes. In this study we aimed to refine this association and investigate the role of low-frequency WFS1 variants in type 2 diabetes risk. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: For fine-mapping, we sequenced WFS1 exons, splice junctions, and conserved noncoding sequences in samples from 24 type 2 diabetic case and 68 control subjects, selected tagging SNPs, and genotyped these in 959 U.K. type 2 diabetic case and 1,386 control subjects. The same genomic regions were sequenced in samples from 1,235 type 2 diabetic case and 1,668 control subjects to compare the frequency of rarer variants between case and control subjects. RESULTS: Of 31 tagging SNPs, the strongest associated was the previously untested 3' untranslated region rs1046320 (P = 0.008); odds ratio 0.84 and P = 6.59 x 10(-7) on further replication in 3,753 case and 4,198 control subjects. High correlation between rs1046320 and the original strongest SNP (rs10010131) (r2 = 0.92) meant that we could not differentiate between their effects in our samples. There was no difference in the cumulative frequency of 82 rare (minor allele frequency [MAF] <0.01) nonsynonymous variants between type 2 diabetic case and control subjects (P = 0.79). Two intermediate frequency (MAF 0.01-0.05) nonsynonymous changes also showed no statistical association with type 2 diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: We identified six highly correlated SNPs that show strong and comparable associations with risk of type 2 diabetes, but further refinement of these associations will require large sample sizes (>100,000) or studies in ethnically diverse populations. Low frequency variants in WFS1 are unlikely to have a large impact on type 2 diabetes risk in white U.K. populations, highlighting the complexities of undertaking association studies with low-frequency variants identified by resequencing.

Original publication

DOI

10.2337/db09-0920

Type

Journal article

Journal

Diabetes

Publication Date

03/2010

Volume

59

Pages

741 - 746

Keywords

Case-Control Studies, Chromosome Mapping, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Exons, Genetic Variation, Haplotypes, Heterozygote, Humans, Membrane Proteins, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, RNA Splice Sites, Risk Factors, United Kingdom