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OBJECTIVE: Asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a common clinical problem. The purpose of this report is to provide an update on the use of diagnostic tests for this condition in clinical practice. PARTICIPANTS: This subgroup was constituted by the Steering Committee to address key questions related to the diagnosis of PHPT. Consensus was established at a closed meeting of the Expert Panel that followed. EVIDENCE: Each question was addressed by a relevant literature search (on PubMed), and the data were presented for discussion at the group meeting. CONSENSUS PROCESS: Consensus was achieved by a group meeting. Statements were prepared by all authors, with comments relating to accuracy from the diagnosis subgroup and by representatives from the participating professional societies. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that: 1) reference ranges should be established for serum PTH in vitamin D-replete healthy individuals; 2) second- and third-generation PTH assays are both helpful in the diagnosis of PHPT; 3) normocalcemic PHPT is a variant of the more common presentation of PHPT with hypercalcemia; 4) serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations should be measured and, if vitamin D insufficiency is present, it should be treated as part of any management course; 5) genetic testing has the potential to be useful in the differential diagnosis of familial hyperparathyroidism or hypercalcemia.

Original publication

DOI

10.1210/jc.2014-1414

Type

Journal article

Journal

J Clin Endocrinol Metab

Publication Date

10/2014

Volume

99

Pages

3570 - 3579

Keywords

Asymptomatic Diseases, Education, Endocrinology, Evidence-Based Medicine, Humans, Hyperparathyroidism, Primary, Practice Guidelines as Topic