Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

If we were to summarize the rationale that underpins medical oncology in a Latin aphorism, it might be 'veneno ergo sum'; that is, I poison, therefore I am. The burden of chemotherapy-associated toxicity is well recognized, but we have relatively few tools that increase the precision of anticancer drug prescribing. We propose a shift in emphasis from the focussed study of polymorphisms in drug metabolic pathways in small sets of patients to broader agnostic analyses to systematically correlate germline genetic variants with adverse events in large, well-defined cancer populations. Thus, we propose the new science of 'toxgnostics' (that is, the systematic, agnostic study of genetic predictors of toxicity from anticancer therapy).

Original publication

DOI

10.1038/nrc3729

Type

Journal article

Journal

Nat Rev Cancer

Volume

14

Pages

440 - 445

Keywords

Antineoplastic Agents, Biomarkers, Tumor, Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions, Humans, Neoplasm Proteins, Neoplasms, Polymorphism, Genetic, Risk Factors