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PURPOSE: Evaluation of three-dimensional MR coronary angiography with the navigator technique for the primary diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with chest pain. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this prospective study 20 patients with chest pain were examined with MR coronary angiography and conventional angiography. The three-dimensional MR coronary angiography was performed using a 1.5 T scanner with an ECG-triggered 3D-FLASH-sequence and retrospective respiratory gating in the navigator technique. The MR coronary angiography was evaluated by two radiologists blinded to the results of the conventional coronary angiography. RESULTS: One patient was excluded from further evaluation due to reduced image quality. Conventional coronary angiography excluded CAD in 8/19 patients, 11/19 patients overall showed 20 stenoses (> 50%) or occlusions. With MR coronary angiography, CAD was correctly excluded in 7 patients, one patient was false positive, one patient was false negative. 14/20 stenoses (> 50%) or occlusions were detected, 5 stenoses were diagnosed false positive. Sensitivity and specificity for primary diagnosis of CAD or detection of coronary artery stenoses were 91% and 88% or 70% and 91%, respectively. DISCUSSION: Using MR coronary angiography with the navigator technique in the primary evaluation of CAD, the diagnosis of stenoses or occlusions of the main coronary arteries is feasible.

Original publication

DOI

10.1055/s-2007-1011039

Type

Journal article

Journal

Rofo

Publication Date

03/1999

Volume

170

Pages

269 - 274

Keywords

Adult, Aged, Coronary Angiography, Coronary Disease, Coronary Vessels, Evaluation Studies as Topic, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Angiography, Male, Middle Aged, Prospective Studies, Sensitivity and Specificity