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Albuminuria (this includes microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria) and reduced glomerular filtration rate are present not only in high-risk populations, but also in the general population. These manifestations of renal disease are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and may reflect subclinical vascular disease. Long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have been vigorously studied for their potential cardioprotective effects. These fatty acids reduce the levels of serum lipids, blood pressure, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction, all of which are associated with albuminuria and renal impairment; therefore, marine-derived n-3 fatty acids may potentially play a role in their prevention. This report reviews the recent findings relating marine-derived n-3 fatty acids to urinary albumin excretion and renal function and their risk factors. Although some evidence suggests that marine-derived n-3 fatty acids are associated with a lower incidence of albuminuria in diabetes, there is inadequate evidence supporting their role in glomerular filtration.

Original publication

DOI

10.1007/s11883-012-0279-3

Type

Journal article

Journal

Current atherosclerosis reports

Publication Date

12/2012

Volume

14

Pages

535 - 541

Addresses

Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, 150 College Street, Room 147C, Toronto, ON M5S 3E2, Canada. christinect.lee@utoronto.ca

Keywords

Animals, Humans, Kidney Diseases, Albuminuria, Cardiovascular Diseases, Fatty Acids, Omega-3, Glomerular Filtration Rate, Risk Factors