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The incidence of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus has been increasing in developing countries over the last three decades and probably reflects a genuine increase in the incidence of its recognized precursor lesion, Barrett's metaplasia. Despite advances in multimodality therapy, the prognosis for invasive esophageal adenocarcinoma is poor. An improved understanding of the molecular biology of this disease may allow improved diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis. We focus on recent developments in the molecular and cell biology of Barrett's metaplasia, a heterogeneous lesion affecting the transitional zone of the gastro-esophageal junction whose associated molecular alterations may vary both in nature and temporally. Early premalignant clones produce biological and genetic heterogeneity as seen by multiple p53 mutations, p16 mutations, aneuploidy, and abnormal methylation resulting in stepwise changes in differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis, allowing disease progression under selective pressure. Abnormalities in expression of growth factors of the epidermal growth factor family and cell adhesion molecules, especially cadherin/catenin complexes, may occur early in invasion. Exploitation of these molecular events may lead to a more appropriate diagnosis and understanding of these lesions in the future.

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/S0002-9440(10)65346-1

Type

Journal article

Journal

Am J Pathol

Publication Date

04/1999

Volume

154

Pages

965 - 973

Keywords

Adenocarcinoma, Aneuploidy, Barrett Esophagus, Cell Cycle, Cell Movement, Clone Cells, Esophageal Neoplasms, Esophagitis, Peptic, Esophagus, Female, Humans, Male, Metaplasia, Neoplasm Invasiveness, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53