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Information from the human genome sequence will eventually alter many aspects of clinical practice. It will increase through our understanding of disease mechanisms, and guide the development of new drugs and therapeutic procedures. In the short term, however, knowledge of the genome will have a profound clinical impact on the diagnostic capability of clinical genetics laboratories. Molecular phenotyping using genetic and genomic information will allow early and more accurate prediction and diagnosis of disease and of disease progression. Medicine will become oriented towards disease prevention rather than efforts to cure people at late stages of illness.

Original publication

DOI

10.1038/nature02624

Type

Journal article

Journal

Nature

Publication Date

05/2004

Volume

429

Pages

453 - 456

Addresses

University of Oxford, Academic Centre, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK. regius@medsci.ox.ac.uk

Keywords

Humans, Disease, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Prognosis, Genetics, Medical, Genomics, Pharmacogenetics