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As part of the MRC’s Clinical Research Capabilities and Technologies Initiative the MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine (WIMM) has been award £4.9m to support the Oxford Single Cell Biology Consortium.

Credit: Dorit Hockman 

From the RDM Image Competition 2015.

An early stage lamprey embryo that has been genetically modified to express the fluorescent protein citrine. This is achieved by injecting a DNA construct, coding for citrine and an enhancer to drive its expression, into the fertilised egg along with an enzyme that assists in inserting the DNA construct into the genome. Here, citrine expression is localised to the developing neural tube, which will give rise to the brain and spinal cord.

The award will be used to develop three integrated centres for single cell biology in Oxford, based at the WIMM, the Welcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics and the South Parks Road Campus (Biochemistry and the MRC Functional Genomics Unit within the Department for Pathology, Anatomy and Genetics).

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