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Seven new genetic regions associated with type 2 diabetes have been identified in the largest study to date of the genetic basis of the disease. DNA data was brought together from more than 48,000 patients and 139,000 healthy controls from four different ethnic groups. The study, published in Nature Genetics, was co-led by Prof Mark McCarthy who said that 'one of the striking features of these data is how much of the genetic variation that influences diabetes is shared between major ethnic groups.

Seven new genetic regions linked to type 2 diabetes

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