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It is with great pleasure that we are able to announce that Professor Rajesh Thakker and Professor Patrik Rorsman have been elected Fellows of the Royal Society.

Fellowship of the Royal Society is made up of the most eminent scientists, engineers and technologists from the UK and the Commonwealth.

Professor Rorsman has made distinguished contributions to our understanding of how the insulin- and glucagon-producing cells of the pancreatic islets regulate the plasma glucose concentration. His pioneering work is a shining example of post-genomic experimental diabetes research that integrates an unusual breadth of sophisticated methods and has clinical implications. It has led to the identification of key processes that become disrupted in type 2 diabetes, and shed light on the causal relationship between obesity and diabetes.

Professor Thakker has made a sustained series of major contributions to endocrinology, particularly parathyroid and renal disorders affecting calcium homeostasis. His research at the basic-science and clinical interface has resulted in seminal gene discoveries and insights into molecular, cellular and physiological mechanisms. These include: identification of functional pathways of calcium-sensing, through characterisation of mutations of the calcium-sensing-receptor, a G-protein-coupled- receptor (GPCR), and its signalling pathway through G-protein-alpha-11-subunit (Gα11) and adaptor-protein-2-sigma-subunit (AP2σ), which regulates GPCR endocytosis; and defining a molecular-based taxonomy of syndromic and non-syndromic hyperparathyroid and hypoparathyroid disorders that has resulted in new pathophysiological insights and advances in diagnosis and treatment.

 
Past Fellows and Foreign Members have included Newton, Darwin and Einstein.
 
For more information visit the Royal Society website or the university website.
 

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