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RDM have introduced a mentoring scheme for all members of staff. The aim of the scheme is to assist all staff to achieve personal and professional growth through a mentoring relationship that provides support as they progress and develop within the University.

Picture of two hospital staff members looking at the image generated from a medical scanner (in the background) on a computer (in the forefront). One of the researchers is pointing at something on the screen.

All staff and students in RDM can register to be mentored and all staff and graduate students with at least 12 months experience in RDM or within the University can register to be a mentor. The RDM Mentoring Scheme Handbook is available which provides all the necessary information about the mentoring scheme. Full details about the mentoring scheme can be found on the mentoring page of the RDM website.

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