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We would all like to wish Prof Kevin Gatter good luck for the future as he retires from University service at the end of this month.

Photo of Prof Kevin Gatter
Prof Kevin Gatter

Kevin became Head of the Department of Cellular Science, when it spun out of the Nuffield Department of Pathology over two decades ago. He then led the Department through mergers with Clinical Biochemistry and the Nuffield Department of Pathology to create NDCLS, which is now a Division within RDM. Kevin was clinically active throughout his career and is an internationally recognised expert in haematopathology. Kevin made seminal research contributions to the development of immunohistochemistry and to the classification of lymphomas, later pursuing an interest in angiogenesis. He was recognised by ISI Thompson Scientific as one of the most highly cited and influential researchers in his field.

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