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Fellows are selected for their exceptional contributions to the advancement of medical science through innovative research discoveries and translating scientific developments into benefits for patients and the wider society.

Graham Ogg photo

Professor Graham Ogg is one of 11 University of Oxford biomedical and health scientists elected to the Academy of Medical Sciences Fellowship.

Professor Ogg has led ground-breaking research into COVID-19 immune responses, as well as continuing with his research into the role of human cutaneous immune responses in mechanisms of disease, treatment and vaccination. He is currently collaborating with colleagues in Sri Lanka to compare COVID-19 responses in different populations, to uncover the role of 'background' immunity to virus strains already in circulation. He has also co-led a study demonstrating that individuals with mild COVID-19 had a different pattern of T cell response when compared to those with more severe infection.

Professor Ogg was also the first recipient of the now annual RDM awards for excellent supervision, with members of his team commending him for 'his incredible enthusiasm and optimism', and for always having time to meet people and provide prompt and excellent feedback. 

Many congratulations to Professor Ogg!

Read the full story on the Oxford University website

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