Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.
We are delighted to announce that Prof Sir David Weatherall has been awarded a GBE, making him a Knight of the Grand Cross. This is the highest rank in the Order of the British Empire and the honour has only been bestowed 16 times since 2000. Prof Sir Weatherall was recognised for his services for medicine and it is wonderful that his pioneering work and commitment to molecular medicine have been recognised in this way.

David Weatherall is a haematologist and clinical researcher whose research has focused on the genetics of blood disorders affecting haemoglobin, particularly thalassaemia. He was the first to describe thalassaemia outside the Mediterranean and his work has led to the eradication of the disease in some parts of the world.

Through his work on thalassaemia, David demonstrated for the first time that a gene deletion could cause a human disease. He developed new methods for analysing haemoglobin and measuring the synthesis of alpha- and beta-haemoglobin chains. This provided the first clear evidence of how thalassaemia arises. In addition, David’s work made possible the detection of thalassaemia early in pregnancy, enabling antenatal diagnosis. His characterisation of the mutations causing thalassaemia led to numerous families being offered genetic counselling.

In 1989, David established the Oxford Institute of Molecular Medicine, which is now named in his honour. He was knighted in 1987. In 2010, he won the Lasker Award, a prestigious US medical research prize, and was the only scientist from outside the United States to win that year.

We want to hear about your news!

Publishing a paper? Just won an award? Get in touch with communications@rdm.ox.ac.uk

 

Similar stories

Spin-out company Alethiomics launches

The enterprise will focus on developing targeted therapies for a specific family of blood cancers.

Iron integral to the development of life on Earth – and the possibility of life on other planets

A collaboration between researchers at the MRC WIMM/RDM and Department of Earth Sciences uncovers the importance of iron for the development of complex life on Earth.

Strong cytotoxic T cell responses to an internal viral component are associated with mild COVID-19 disease

Study from the Dong Group reveals key differences in the adaptive immune responses of patients with mild vs. severe COVID-19, highlighting a potential new vaccine target.

Study reveals ‘stop-eating’ response to DNA damage

A new study from the Patel Group sheds light on the mechanism by which DNA damage suppresses appetite, a finding with implications for understanding the appetite lowering side-effects of chemotherapy.

$2m awarded to explore the role of ancestry in vaccine response

The Lymph nodE single-cell Genomics AnCestrY (LEGACY) Network will create an ethnically diverse single-cell atlas of the response to commonly used vaccines such as flu vaccines with a focus on responses in lymph nodes.