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RDM researchers are taking part in the Oxford International Women’s Festival (24-11 March), which celebrates ‘Women Thinking Big in the Arts, Science, Politics and Education’.

Logo of Oxford International Women’s Festival

Dr Mariane Bertagnolli (Leeson Group) will be giving a special Oxford Sci Bar talk about the links between maternal health and heart health. Join her from 7pm on 28 February at St Aldates Tavern in Oxford, to learn more about the long term impact of pregnancy complications and how research is helping to make positive changes to heart health. The evening is free and there is no need to register in advance.

Dr Charlotte Hooper (Gehmlich Group) had created a comic book-style tour of the human heart and what can go wrong in cardiomyopathy – an inherited form of heart disease. Her artwork will be on display at Inky Fingers – Oxford’s only Comic Book shop – from 25 February to 4 March. Come along to illustrate your own comic book ending to her research story.

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