Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Charalambos Antoniades on AI-derived biomarkers that can predict heart attacks years before they happen

Professor Charalambos Antoniades is one of the researchers interviewed as part of the University's AI showcase, about his team's work developing technology that analyses coronory tomography (CT) angiograms to flag patients that are at risk of deadly heart attacks.

Heart attacks are usually caused by inflamed plaques in the coronary artery causing an abrupt blockage of blood getting to the heart. Professor Antoniades’ team has developed a technology, called the fat attenuation index (FAI), which detects the inflamed plaques prone to causing heart attacks by analysing CT images of the fat surrounding the arteries – something that is filtered out by any standard CT image analysis software.

Dr Antoniades said: "‘For the first time we have a set of biomarkers, derived from a routine test that is already used in everyday clinical practice, that measures what we call the “residual cardiovascular risk”, currently missed by all risk scores and non-invasive tests.

‘Knowing who is at increased risk for a heart attack could allow us to intervene early enough to prevent it. I expect these biomarkers to become an essential part of standard CT coronary angiography reporting in the coming years.’

Read the full article on the Oxford University website.

Read The Lancet paper on the Fat Attenuation Index.

We want to hear about your news!

Publishing a paper? Just won an award? Get in touch with communications@rdm.ox.ac.uk

 

Similar stories

RDM researchers awarded Oxford-Bristol Myers Squibb Fellowships

The Oxford - Bristol Myers Squibb (BMS) Fellowships Programme continued to demonstrate significant progress over the last year, despite the challenges associated with the global pandemic, including restricted lab access and work from home guidance. Six new Oxford-BMS Fellowships for 2021 were announced.

Changes in blood cell production over the human lifetime may hold clues to patterns of disease

A new paper published this week in Cell Reports reveals that changes in the gene expression of blood stem cells occur across the human lifetime; an important step in the understanding and treatment of blood disorders.

COVID-19 recovery project nominated for HSJ award

The project, involving Oxford University Hospitals, Defence Medical Services (DMS), and the Radcliffe Department of Medicine is in the running for a prestigious honour at the Health Service Journal Awards 2021.