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Dr Mayooran Shanmuganathan, currently a Clinical Research Fellow as well as a DPhil student at RDM, has been awarded the Alison Brading Memorial Graduate Scholarship in Medical Science by Lady Margaret Hall, to continue his DPhil study at the college.

Dr Shanmuganathan is in the second year of his DPhil, which aims to investigate he utility of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in acute myocardial injury as part of the OxAMI study, He is supervised by Profs Vanessa Ferreira, Keith Channon and Stefan Piechnik

Dr Shanmuganathan said "I'm grateful to Lady Margaret Hall and to the donors of the scholarship fund (Prof Margaret Matthews and family) for this award."

"I am also inspired by the personal and scientific accomplishments of Prof Alison Brading, on whose name the award is given, to achieve my maximum potential during my studies at the University of Oxford and beyond."

After completing his DPhil, Dr Shanmuganathan plans to work as an academic cardiology consultant in advanced heart failure and cardiac imaging. 

Many congratulations to Dr Shanmuganathan!

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