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Congratulations to Dr Jame Felce, a postdoc with Simon Davis in the WIMM, who has been awarded a Sir Henry Wellcome Post-doctoral Fellowship.

Credit: Angela Lee

From the RDM Image Competition 2015. 

This image shows a population of cultured macrophages (Raw 264.7) stained for phospholipids (red) and neutral lipid droplets (green), which are markers of macrophage foam cell formation in atherosclerosis. To recapitulate the in vivo course of macrophages in atherosclerotic plague formation, the cells were treated with oxidized LDL for 24 hours prior to imaging. The accumulation of macrophage foam cells in atherosclerotic lesions is associated with both initiation and progression of this disease. By quantifying the phospholipids and neutral lipid droplets using high-throughput imaging system, potential drug target or gene pathway may be identified.

This fellowship provides a unique opportunity for the most promising newly qualified postdoctoral researchers to make an early start in developing their independent research careers, working in the best research environments in the UK and overseas.The fellowship is for 4 years and James will be working with Prof. Mike Dustin at the Kennedy Institute but also partly at the ETH Zurich. He will be studying the role of G protein-coupled receptors in the regulation of T-cell activation using a number of imaging and microfluidic techniques.

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