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Congratulations to Huw Colin-York, Quentin Ferry and Thomas Riffelmacher, who won 2017’s RDM Graduate Prize. All three students displayed research excellence during their DPhil studies and have helped to progress their respective fields.

HuwCollinYork.jpgDr Colin-York completed his DPhil with Prof Christian Eggeling and Dr Marco Fritzsche (IMD-WIMM), investigating biophysical forces in immune cells by combining force measuring techniques with super-resolution microscopy. He was awarded the Prize for developing a methodology to study T cell activation, which may lead to changes in the field, and establishing a valuable strategic collaboration. Huw was also commended for his dedication to teaching microscopy skills to school pupils and to overseas researchers. Learn more about his work here.

 

Dr Riffelmacher completed his DPhil with Prof Sten Eirik Jacobsen 283513329TomRiffelmacher21.jpg(NDCLS-WIMM) and Prof Katja Simon (NDORMS). He explored the role that autophagy, a cellular recycling pathway, has during the differentiation of blood and immune cells. He was awarded the Prize for establishing a new mechanism by which autophagy controls differentiation and for his entrepreneurial spirit. Learn more about his work here.

 

 

Quentin.png

Dr Quentin Ferry completed his DPhil with Associate Prof Tudor Fulga (NDCLS-WIMM), employing RNA-engineering to develop novel inducible CRISPR/Cas9 systems, whose activity can be conditioned on genetically encoded, or externally delivered, triggers. He was awarded the Prize for developing and applying new methods in genome editing, which promise to progress the field. Learn more about his work here.

 

 

All three winners received £500 and presented their research at the RDM Symposium on 19 March 2018. Find out more about the RDM Graduate Prize and previous winners.

 

 

 

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Publishing a paper? Just won an award? Get in touch with communications@rdm.ox.ac.uk

 

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