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Young researcher with test tube and pipette.

Dr Svetlana Reilly, a postdoc with Prof Barbara Casadei in Cardiovascular Medicine, won the Young Research Worker Prize at the 2013 British Cardiovascular Society annual meeting, for her talk entitled “A dystrophin-dependent loss of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in atrial fibrillation (AF) promotes electrical remodelling and creates a substrate for the maintenance of AF”.

Marios Margaritis, a DPhil student with Dr Charalambos Antoniades in Cardiovascular Medicine, won the Young Investigator Award at the 2013 joint meeting of the British Society for Cardiovascular Research and the British Atherosclerosis Society, for his talk entitled “A novel cross-talk between perivascular adipose tissue and the arterial wall controls redox state in human atherosclerosis”.

Vikram Sharma, a DPhil student with Prof Andrew Wilkie in the WIMM, won the Young Investigator of the Year award at the 2013 European Human Genetics Conference, for his talk entitled "Mutations of TCF12, encoding a basic-helix-loop-helix-partner of TWIST1, are a frequent cause of coronal craniosynostosis".

Congratulations to them all on their well deserved achievement.

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