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The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research and Molecular Medicine has announced that the third Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine will be conferred to David J. Weatherall, MD, FRCP, FRS, founder of the Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine. The award is in recognition of his discoveries in inherited disorders of hemoglobin.

The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research and Molecular Medicine has announced that the third Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine will be conferred to David J. Weatherall, MD, FRCP, FRS, founder of the Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine. The award is in recognition of his discoveries in inherited disorders of hemoglobin.

The Cerami award, which includes a $20,000 prize, is conferred semi-annually by the peer-reviewed, open-access journal Molecular Medicine published by the Feinstein Institute Press. A monograph authored by Professor Sir David Weatherall, entitled “A Journey in Science: Early Lessons from the Hemoglobin Field” was published online in Molecular Medicine in November 2014.

“The Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine was created to recognize investigators who provided the crucial, early insight and ideas that are the essence of discovery, creating new fields and research trajectories followed by the persistent clinical investigation that ultimately changes how disease is prevented, diagnosed and treated,” said Kevin J. Tracey, MD, president of the Feinstein Institute, editor emeritus of Molecular Medicine and Cerami Award committee member. “Professor Sir David Weatherall’s research over the last 50 years has improved clinical treatment worldwide for disorders relates to hemoglobin. His monograph is a fascinating story encompassing
a career in military service in Singapore, schooling in the US, and developing the Institute of Molecular Medicine in England.”

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