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Below are outlines of potential DPhil (PhD) research opportunities in each of our research groups interested in recruiting students for October 2019 entry. Applicants are strongly encouraged to contact supervisors in advance of application to discuss potential projects or directions for research they may be able to take. This is to ensure that there is a good fit between the student and the lab and is considered an integral part of our admissions process. Applications for funded places through the RDM Scholars Programme are now closed. Some supervisors may still be able to consider applications from students who have alternative means of funding (for example, charitable funding, clinical fellows or applicants with funding from a foreign government or equivalent). Prospective applicants are strongly advised to contact their prospective supervisor in advance of making an application. Please note that any applications received after the main funding deadline will not be assessed until all applications that were received by the deadline have been processed. This may affect supervisor availability. If you are considering making an application after the funding deadline, we advise you to submit your application as soon as possible. This allows more time to complete all admissions processes and makes it easier to find a college place. The latest date you can apply for a place for October 2019 entry in Friday 26 July 2019.

Information for supervisors © Martin Phelps
Antoniades group 2013 translational cardiovascular research cross talk between adipose tissue and the cardiovascular system in humans

Antoniades Group – Translational cardiovascular research: cross-talk between adipose tissue and the cardiovascular system in humans

We undertake translational research by moving from bench to bedside and vice versa; our main focus is the cross-talk between adipose tissue and the cardiovascular system.

De bruijn group developmental haematopoiesis

de Bruijn Group - Developmental Haematopoiesis

Development of the hematopoietic/ immune system in the embryo

Boultwood group 2013 molecular pathogenesis of the myelodysplastic syndromes

Boultwood Group – Molecular pathogenesis of the myelodysplastic syndromes

The main focus of our group is the investigation of the molecular mechanisms involved in disease initiation and progression in the myeloid malignancy myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We use a variety of techniques, including next-generation sequencing (RNA-seq), induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology and CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing, in order to better understand disease pathogenesis and to identify new therapeutic targets and prognostic markers for MDS.

Choudhury group trained innate immunity in atherosclerosis

Choudhury Group - Trained innate immunity in atherosclerosis

This laboratory studies the role of the innate immune system (monocytes / macrophages) on the progression and regression of atherosclerosis. Recent work (In revision) has shown how diabetes results in epigenetic changes in bone marrow progenitor cells that have important implications for atherosclerosis progression and, indeed, a range of common diseases.

Davis group t cell biology

Davis Group - T Cell Biology

Studying how lymphocytes decide to mount immune responses against, for example, tumours (cancer immunotherapy).

Douglas group 2013 functional coronary artery disease genetics

Douglas Group – Functional coronary artery disease genetics

Defining the function of new causal atherosclerosis genes from CAD GWAS loci using in vitro and in vivo models

Drakesmith group iron and immunity

Drakesmith Group - Iron and Immunity

Iron, immunity, anaemia, and infection

Eggeling group

Eggeling Group

Molecular nano-immunology and optical microscopy

Farrall group 2013 genetic epidemiology of cardiovascular disease

Farrall Group – Genetic Epidemiology of Cardiovascular Disease

Studying genetic variation in cardiomyopathy and coronary artery disease across the entire allele frequency spectrum in order to identify causative genes and susceptibility loci.

Fulga group genome engineering and synthetic biology

Fulga Group - Genome Engineering and Synthetic Biology

Design and implementation of synthetic circuits for research and therapeutic applications

Gibbons group atrx group

Gibbons Group - ATRX Group

Chromatin remodelling in health and disease

Gill group 2013 development of gene therapy and gene editing for lung disorders

Gill Group – Development of Gene Therapy and Gene Editing for Lung Disorders

The Gene Medicine Research Group is based in the John Radcliffe Hospital and is focused on the development of new gene therapeutics for lung diesases. We use gene therapy and gene editing approaches employing plasmid, lentiviral and AAV platforms for gene delivery in vivo. We are looking for students interested in the translation of new gene therapies to the clinic, including the development of new vectors, and evaluation in animal models of disease.

Gloyn group 2013 genomics of diabetes functional characterisation of t2d gwas

Gloyn Group – Genomics of Diabetes: Functional characterisation of T2D GWAS

Diabetes already affects 415 million people worldwide. In the UK, there will be 5M people with type 2 diabetes (T2D) by 2025, accounting for 1 in 30 prescriptions and £25 billion in annual NHS costs. The focus of the Gloyn group is the translation of genetic association signals for type 2 diabetes and glycaemic traits into mechanisms for beta‐cell dysfunction and diabetes.

Goriely group clinical genetics

Goriely Group - Clinical Genetics

De Novo Mutations, Selfish Selection, Mosaicism and Human Disease

Higgs group laboratory of gene regulation

Higgs Group - Laboratory of Gene Regulation

Using state-of-the-art laboratory and computational approaches to understand how mammalian genes are switched on and off during development and differentiation and how this goes awry in human genetic diseases.

Hodson group 2013 human liver fat metabolism and metabolic disease

Hodson Group – Human liver fat metabolism and metabolic disease

Understanding the underlying causes and mechanistic basis for intrahepatic fat storage to identify ways of preventing and treating fatty liver disease.

Hughes group genomics gene regulation and disease

Hughes Group - Genomics, gene regulation and disease

Applying a wide range of genomics methods and technologies to understand how gene expression is regulated.

Hyde group 2013 airway liver and muscle gene transfer to create therapeutic protein factories

Hyde Group – Airway, Liver and Muscle Gene Transfer to Create Therapeutic Protein Factories

We are focusing on strategies to deliver therapeutics via in vivo delivery of gene transfer vectors to generate ectopic “protein factories” capable of secreting therapeutic proteins into both the lung lumen and the systemic circulation. These approaches aim to provide an increased quality of life and a decreased treatment cost for a range of lung diseases, endocrine diseases and inborn errors of metabolism. The protein factories are established using conventional gene therapy or applying in vivo gene editing to correct defective loci and enable therapeutic protein expression.

Karpe group 2013 human fat distribution and metabolic disease

Karpe Group – Human fat distribution and metabolic disease

Identifying the mechanistic basis for site-specific fat storage to identify new ways of tackling the metabolic consequences of obesity.

Kerr cai group 2013 tumour microenvironment and colorectal cancer development

Kerr-Cai Group – Tumour microenvironment and colorectal cancer development

Our group has conducted a series of international adjuvant trials of chemotherapy for colorectal cancer (Kerr RS. et al, (2016), Lancet Oncol, 17, 1543 – 1557). In parallel, we have established a biorepository of tissue and constitutional DNA (n=3500) which has allowed us to generate a number of cancer susceptibility SNPs and commercial partners to characterise a prognostic mRNA signature which assists in selection of patients for chemotherapy and evaluation of drug resistance (Orlando G. et al, (2016), Hum Mol Genet, 25, 2349 – 2359).

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