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Mike Levine, director of the Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics at Princeton University, is a developmental biologist who has dedicated his career to understanding how gene expression is regulated during development. Some of his most significant research, such as the co-discovery of the homeobox genes and his work on even skipped stripe 2, was performed in Drosophila, but he has since branched out to Ciona intestinalis, which he is using as a model to understand how vertebrate features have evolved. We had a lively chat with Mike at this year's Society for Developmental Biology (SDB) meeting, where he was awarded the Edwin Grant Conklin Medal.

Original publication

DOI

10.1242/dev.130609

Type

Journal article

Journal

Development

Publication Date

15/10/2015

Volume

142

Pages

3453 - 3455

Keywords

Animals, Awards and Prizes, Ciona intestinalis, Developmental Biology, Drosophila melanogaster, Genes, Homeobox, Genomics, History, 20th Century, History, 21st Century, Humans, Societies, Medical